Create Register Of Independent Australian Cultural Venues

 

Art grants should be allowed to go as far as possible.

Subsidise TV Audio Description & Captioning

End Efficiency Dividends For All National Cultural Institutions

 

Free access for all Australians to our cultural and heritage sites

Live Performances, Streamed Online And In Regional Cinemas

Engaging Australian Retirees

Protecting The Australian Film & Television Industry

 

Supporting Australian Arts & Heritage Sectors

nat-arts-week

The Issue

The current position of investment in the Arts, Cultural and Heritage sectors of Australia is completely untenable. We want a profound shift in their treatment. It is a critical part of the innovative future we must foster to be competitive. Opportunity, Accessibility, Participation and Engagement in Arts and Culture must be prioritised by our governments for the benefit of all Australians.

 

The Solution?

The full return of Australia Council funding removed from the 2014 and 2015 budgets

Additionally we want a TRIPLING of the actual budget distributed through grants to artists and small/medium sized organisations across Australia. This would equate to $124m in additional annual funding.

AMPAG ring-fenced funding to remain at current levels but be distributed by the Ministry of Arts directly.

The immediate suspension of efficiency dividends on all national cultural institutions, The Australia Council and the Ministry for the Arts for at least the next 5 years.

We want all distributed arts grants to no longer be liable for income tax for the individuals receiving them. The revenue generated by the ATO through this, balanced with the loss of time and value to the grant, make it inefficient and unneeded.

The Arts are central to a rounded education. Education is critical to the future prosperity and success of this country. Therefore we want the inclusion of the arts in the Government’s innovation and STEM agendas, and for music, visual and media art to become mandatory in primary schools.

We also want Australian state secondary schools to offer access to the three subjects mentioned above, as well as drama and dance; to be taught at least once a week by a trained teacher.

The creation of a National Arts Week, a 7 day opportunity to highlight, celebrate, participate in and experience the Arts in every form, by as many Australians as possible across the country.

Free entry to all government funded museums and galleries up to the age of 21 and over the age of 65.

The placement of artists-in-residence in primary and secondary schools across the country, through expanding the existing chaplains program, to integrate creative practice in our communities and offer educational value.

 

Pay Parity For All Public School Teachers

teacher-pay

The Issue

To run a great education system, you need to be able to attract the best people to the job. Without decent pay, for all teachers, and a world class education system we will never be able to compete on the international innovation stage.

 

Equity of pay across the country, for Teachers, is an essential part of creating a world class education system.

 

The future of Australian Education was supported by the development of a National Curriculum. In the same way, the future of the Australian Education system will be enhanced by ensuring equity of pay, and decent levels of pay, for all teachers (with specific allowance for further benefits to be awarded to those willing to work in some regional areas, and areas of greatest need).

 

When we become a really mature, grown-up, wise society, we will put teachers at the centre of the community, where they belong. We don’t honour them enough, we don’t pay them enough.

Charles Kuralt

 

 

It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.

Albert Einstein

 

The Solution?

We will work with State and Territory governments to fund an “equal pay for teachers” campaign that would see all teachers paid the same amount.

 

Expand Producers Offset To All Areas of The Creative Industries

 

More Arts Performance In Public Spaces

nat-arts-week

Many cities and rural centres around the world are facing a loss of public spaces. [needs more]

 

Across Australia many opportunities are missed due to a lack of the right tools, skills, experience and knowledge or through restrictive organisational processes that hamper a manager, programmer or venue owner’s ability to produce work effectively.

 

Architecture is about public space held by buildings.

Richard Rogers

 

The Arts Party wish to work closely with the live music and performance community, to deliver a comprehensive program of support ranging from regulatory reform to grants funding and the building of free rehearsal spaces. We will develop a live music and performance action plan to deliver a network of new and upgraded performance spaces, in urban areas and rural centres, across the country.

 

Create $250m Broadcast Production Fund

 

Lower Voting Age To 16

16-voting

Politics is about deciding the future for this country. Who has the most at stake?

At the age of 16 you can drive a car, fly a plane, have legal sex, join the army and fight in war, claim Youth Allowance, work and pay taxes, even enrol to vote… but you don’t get to actually vote until you reach 18. Ridiculous!

 

Research has shown that the average Australian 16 year old is far more interested and engaged in politics than the average 18 year old and statistically have an extra couple of years to live with the consequences of our political decisions. Young voters are becoming disillusioned with elections. Catch them early and teach them the value of democracy.

 

Does it make sense to you?

 

 

 

Top Ten Reasons to Lower the Voting Age

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21716030-young-voters-are-becoming-disillusioned-elections-catch-them-early-and-teach-them-value

http://www.voteat16.ie/nine_reasons (Irish)

 

Mental Health

Approximately 20 per cent of the Australian population will experience mental illness in any given year.

 

Currently, mental health services receive around 5.25% of the overall health budget while representing 12% of the total burden of disease on society. There is no reason those figures should exactly match, but the gap is large and revealing.

 

Depression related suicide is the biggest killer of men under 45 in Australia.

 

We recommend as a solution:

 

increased specific funding for early intervention programs in schools, the internet and school-based clinics

services improved and funded to meet increasing demands

ensure that people with a mental illness receive high quality and targeted services

support the implementation of VicHealth’s: Promoting Mental Health Through Accessing Arts plan

In particular, we recognise that three determinants of mental health and wellbeing are:

 

Social inclusion

Freedom from discrimination and violence

Access to economic resources

We will support Australian Arts organisations in being health promoting, by helping them to:

 

Create a healthy, safe and inclusive environment and culture

Develop programs and projects that promote access, social inclusion and mental health and wellbeing

Form community links and partnerships, particularly in Aboriginal communities.

We must stop the senseless loss of lives and sorrow this creates every year through basic inaction.

 

World Mental Health Day

Mental Health in Multicultural Australia Project

 

 

Assisted Dying

We believe every dying person should be given the choice to control their death if they decide their suffering is unbearable.

 

While limited improvement has been passed in Victoria, it is currently illegal in the rest of Australia.

 

We believe Australians should be given:

 

CHOICE over where we die, who is present and our treatment options.

ACCESS to expert information on our options, good quality end-of-life care.

CONTROL over how we die, our symptoms, pain relief and planning our own death.

We cannot choose how and where we’re born, but how we die, and to be allowed to die with dignity, should be a basic human right.

 

We support the work of http://www.gogentleaustralia.org.au/

 

 

 

Legalise Cannabis

The war on drugs has failed. It could never be won. It’s a war on human nature.

 

There is no better example of the misguided approach to drugs legislation than Cannabis. this is not a gateway drug, or some scourge. It’s literally a plant that thrives in Australia as a weed. Yet young lives are being destroyed in this ridiculous fight.

 

Currently we waste millions of tax-payer dollars trying to enforce prohibition.

A regulated market would redirect funding to education, health and harm reduction.

Legalisation would raise an estimated $5bn in revenue for Australian communities.

Legalisation would ease the burden on our prison system.

Legalisation would take a huge profit source away from organised crime in Australia.

 

 

We need to start making sense on this issue and turn a wrong into a right for our future.

 

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/03/make-drugs-dull-legalising-cannabis-the-canadian-way/

http://www.sbs.com.au/topics/marijuana-legalisation

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/economics/illegal-drugs-industry-adds-6bn-to-economy/news-story/b2270722209ea11a6a1db3674f428af2

 

 

No Sleeping Rough (unless you want to)

There’s no excuse in Australia today for Australians to be without basic safe shelter anywhere in the country.

 

In a country a rich and prosperous as ours, it is frankly unbelievable to see so many in our communities going without basic secure shelter and a place to wash up every day. Over 100,000 are sleeping rough tonight, about 1 in every 200 people. In fact 1 in 8 Australians have experienced homelessness in their lives.

 

Tonight, over 1000 children under 12 years of age are sleep rough in Australia.

 

We believe more social housing must be built and more financial support given to all not for profits that feed and protect homeless Australians. Additionally a relatively quick solution like the Sleep Bus, is an excellent way to help people keep safe at night.

 

https://www.sleepbus.org/

 

The amount of people sleep rough is sadly growing every day. We want our governments to commit to more than halving homelessness by 2025

 

 

 

Prison Reform in Australia

In a country with relatively low (and dropping) crime rate, paradoxically Australia has a high incarceration rate. The projections are that prison populations are set to rise and accelerate primarily because of even harsher sentencing. Most states have accelerated their prison construction programs.

 

Basically, Australian prisons right now don’t work. It’s an extremely expensive blunt and harmful instrument if you looking at it as a crime control mechanism. Nearly half of all adult prisoners are re-convicted within one year of release. If you’re aboriginal, your chances of getting locked up are 14x higher than the rest of the population.

 

And it’s not cheap. It costs around $90,000 to $100,000 a year to house someone in prison and prison construction is extremely expensive. That’s simply unsustainable.

 

We have to get over our fixation on retribution rather than rehabilitation.

 

We believe these are the approaches we should be taking:

 

For low risk offenders, more home detention involving electronic bracelets or anklets.

Artificial intelligence, machine-learning algorithms and lightweight electronic sensors will monitor convicted offenders on a 24-hour basis (it’s coming) so we need to focus on quality prisons, not quantity.

For high risk violent prisoners, confinement is necessary but with rehabilitation as the primary purpose. Rehabilitation must be achieved or sentences can be extended.

Develop ‘open’ prisons for low risk inmates not bound by walls. Prisoners can work and must return each night to the facility. Confinement is the primary punishment. Education, arts and communal activity must be primary activities – each prison is a community.

25% of prisoners currently are on remand (not convicted), each of them inside for an indeterminate amount of time. They currently have no access to any internal training or education as they’re not convicted. We need to keep far more of them out of prison via electronic tagging to stop them hardening and actually feeling like victims of the system.

There will always be a need to protect society from serious offenders but this is a tiny fraction of the prison population

We must offer prisoners a clear chance to change, for those trying hard to turn themselves around. We must place rehabilitation as the core purpose of prison. Every inmate in prison should end up going back to the society, and they need all the help they can get.

 

Why Norway’s prison system is so successful

Home

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-14/how-ai-could-put-an-end-to-prisons-as-we-know-them/8794910

 

Turbocharging Australian Education

greatteaching

The Issue

‘Education is the most powerful weapon which we can use to change the World“

Nelson Mandela

 

We want quality, affordable and lifelong learning opportunities for all Australians. Education improves us as individuals, and in turn strengthens us as a people. It is the ultimate WIN-WIN.

 

‘Education is not the learning of facts, but training the mind to think’

Albert Einstein

 

The Solution?

We believes that every high school student in Australia should, at a minimum, be able to attend dance, drama, media arts, music or visual arts classes taught at least weekly by a trained teacher as part of their curriculum. We endorse the Australian Arts Curriculum and call for it to be implemented immediately. The curriculum outline can be accessed here.

We endorse all the findings of the Gonski report into primary schools and fully supports its complete implementation. The Commonwealth government should provide increased capital funding to all schools, government and non-government, and there should be a greater monitoring and reporting on school infrastructure in all sectors and states. http://www.igiveagonski.com.au/whats_gonski

We call for for music, visual and media art to become mandatory in all primary schools. We also want Australian secondary schools to also offer access to all three, as well as drama and dance, taught at least once a week by a trained teacher.

The placement of artists-in-residence in primary and secondary schools across the country, through expanding the existing chaplains program, to integrate creative practice in our communities and offer educational value.

In order to encourage more individuals to partake in higher education, and lifelong learning in order to gain qualifications, we propose that HECS payment rates should be halved and not linked to inflation.

A 75% subsidy on enrolment fees for retirees wishing to undertake additional higher education study in Australia.

The pursuit of knowledge alone should not incur a cost and must be made possible by continued development of MOOCS (Massive Open Online Courses) by universities and learning facilities across Australia. We would want an additional fund created and funded with $50m pa to encourage the creation and promotion of these course to all Australians.

Pay parity for all Australian teaching staff in Australian public primary and high schools based on existing best state level wage, with an immediate 7% pay increase.

We want funding for a 10 year research plan to completely restructure the National Curriculum. Ultimately the entire way we are taught needs to be addressed. School education should prepare us for adult life, not just in being ’employable’, but also to make us good citizens that understand ourselves and others far better. Ethics is essential and practical skills around money should be integral to the mathematical elements of the curriculum. Creative lateral skills should be integrated throughout the curriculum. We need to better prepare the generation for the worklife challenges ahead.

 

Boost Mental Health Support

mental-health

The Issue

Approximately 20 per cent of the Australian population will experience mental illness in any given year.

 

The last federal budget allocated A$115 million in new funding over four years. This is one of the smallest investments in the sector in recent years.

 

For instance, the Council of Australian Governments (CoAG) added more than $5.5 billion to mental health spending in 2006. The 2011-12 federal budget provided $2.2 billion in new funding.

 

This compounds a situation in which, in 2014-15, mental health received around 5.25% of the overall health budget while representing 12% of the total burden of disease. There is no reason those figures should exactly match, but the gap is large and revealing.

 

Depression suicide is the biggest killer of men under 45 in Australia.

 

The Solution?

increased specific funding for early intervention programs in schools, the internet and school-based clinics

services improved and funded to meet increasing demands

ensure that people with a mental illness receive high quality and targeted services

support the implementation of VicHealth’s: Promoting Mental Health Through Accessing Arts plan

In particular, we recognise that three determinants of mental health and wellbeing are:

 

Social inclusion

Freedom from discrimination and violence

Access to economic resources

The arts are about social inclusion and valuing diversity, and they can contribute to greater access to economic resources among marginalised populations.

 

In support of the VicHealth Promoting Mental Health Through Accessing Arts plan – we will support Australian Arts organisations in being health promoting, by helping them to:

 

Create a healthy, safe and inclusive environment and culture

Develop programs and projects that promote access, social inclusion and mental health and wellbeing

Form community links and partnerships

Some important viewing:

 

 

 

Further Links

The art of being mentally healthy: a study to quantify the relationship between recreational arts engagement and mental well-being in the general population

World Mental Health Day

Mental Health in Multicultural Australia Project

 

Supporting the Australian Video Game/Digital Arts Industry

videogameindustry

The Issue

In 2015, Australians spent $2.832 billion on video games. Digital sales accounted for $1.589 billion of that figure. When we look at the global market, worth well over $100bn annually, the potential for local game developers is huge. Up to 95% of revenue can come from overseas, making game development a net export market for the local industry, bringing new wealth into the country.

 

As an emergent art form that has become bigger than all others, bar cinema, we believe that it is well past time that the games sector was recognised politically as both a key creative and economic opportunity for Australia. Currently, there is no direct support for games at a federal government level.

 

The Solution?

We want the return of the Interactive Games Fund, cancelled by the current government, with a DOUBLING of its original funding. This would constitute a $40 million investment over three years, designed to encourage innovative new approaches and start-ups in the digital arts and video gaming/entertainment industry. Critically, we believe this funding should be invested primarily through multiple-year grants.

Game development businesses in particular, require more than single project work to be sustainable, and by helping to support the hiring of talent, attend shows and develop marketing collateral, we can create a thriving and profitable industry in Australia.

We believe the Interactive Games Fund should be focused on helping homegrown Australian companies to grow into sustainable businesses, rather than produce a single digital product or game.

To further support this aim, we want the establishment of a Digital Funding body, which would take responsibility for encouraging both video game companies and other emergent and digital-orientated projects to achieve success. The video game industry operates on very different business models, and has very different creative and commercial challenges, compared to the film or television industries. In recognition of this they deserve a tailored approach.

We also want video game companies to be able access to the Australian Producers Offset, currently supporting Film & TV projects. This would give a much-needed boost to investment in small and medium-sized Australian games companies.

We applaud the recent initiative of the GDAA and the Victorian government in creating and supporting The Arcade, a shared working space that supports small games enterprises. It is an excellent template, transferable to the whole nation. We call on all state governments to mirror this initiative in supporting their own start-ups.

Finally, given the importance of technology in all our lives, we also support ongoing coding in schools initiatives as a key part of media arts education for a creative future.